Tag Archive | cultivating

Brave Daffodil

brave daffodil

 

Yesterday afternoon there was a bit of sunshine so I stepped out for a walk since the garden was too cold and wet to work.  Along the edge of the road, I spied this daffodil growing of its own free will midst snow, grass, brambles.  It spoke to me of the brightness of our divine nature which we can cultivate so that it blossoms in spite of what is around us, in spite of the cold of a world where the human beings risk reverting to nothing more than thinking animals.

 “(On) man(‘s head) My Word is the ice crown.  The noise opens the mouth, (but it) closes the ear.”

The Revelation of Arès vii/15-16

The snow in the ditch is a crown of ice for this brave flower.  How many of us are cold, indifferent to the fact that our Creator manifested in Arès?  If we listen to His call to change, we will flourish, other bulbs will take root, there can be a whole field of bright yellow, of souls seeking to be and do Good.

No, this not daffy–it is totally possible if we get to work.

 

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Amaryllis and Ginger



Here is this year’s amaryllis in full bloom.  The main stem gave six blossoms and the second stem gave four.  I gave them a bit of a shake to dislodge pollen wondering if they will form seed like last year’s did.

This is last year’s amaryllis.  I didn’t know it would come back to life so soon, sending up such magnificent floral stalks.


Here is the start of another experiment–planting a ginger rhizome.  We shall see…

Now just watching for signs of growth. 

The Little Red Hen Loves Compost


“The compost bin is full and no one can be found to empty it,” said my mother-in-law.


It bothers me to encumber the municipal garbage disposal system with compostables and also I had made several piles of vegetation by tidying up the irises so I got busy and dug out the rich dark treasure.


There were some composting errors…

…and some composting prizes!


I chose beds to be the lucky recipients, starting with the rose still flowering, blessing us with its perfume, and continued on above where it looked like mostly weeds were growing.  There should be bulbs in there so I didn’t fork it over, just scratched a bit.

There is something I find so fulfilling about compost, even though this work may benefit an unknown person since the house may soon be sold.  It’s hard to let go of a place that has been part of my life for 34 years where many happy moments have been shared.

Picture Perfect : Busy



All these plants are busy growing.  I need to get busy and garden if I want to maintain the design I intended, harmonious to my eyes.

The inner garden requires care and vigilance also.  Crabbiness can quickly take over just like crabgrass in the flower bed.

The sower has gone out.*  We decide whether or not we will cultivate the seeds of goodness in our inner garden which will create an outer garden, the world, of peace and harmony.

*The Revelation of Arès 5/1

For more entries on the them of busy, go to Picture Perfect.

Overnight Sensation

One day there was nothing and the next, a miracle had occurred.

I saw two swallows.  The saying goes “une hirondelle ne fait pas le printemps” (one swallow doesn’t make spring) but how about two?  And they have already decorated my car…

Chou Daubenton

chou daubenton 1
This spring at a plant exchange a lady gave me some branchy type things with cabbage leaves.  She said just stick these in the ground and then you’ll have perpetual cabbages, just break off the side shoots and eat them.  They are called chou Daubenton.  Chou means cabbage, but I don’t know why the name Daubenton.

I stuck them in and they took and now they have grown so I was wondering should I cut the growing tip or wait until the side shoots get bigger and just eat them.  I did some googling and found a very nice forum that is mainly for tomatoes, but they branch out into other things also.  I was advised to cut them so that they will be compact and not break this winter.

 

So tonight was the great adventure on our plates.  People compare them to asparagus or broccoli.  A nearby farmer’s wife said she considers them to be for the rabbits.  So I really didn’t know what to expect. 

 

chou daubenton 2

I decided to steam them and serve with vinaigrette.  I didn’t know how far to go in preparing them.  Should I pare the stems like I do broccoli?  Will the leaves be tough?

 

chou daubenton 3
Here they are, ready to be cooked.  I took off some of the leaves and gave them to the chickens.  I steamed them for about 10 minutes, then let cool a bit.  They were very good, very much like broccoli and yes, I should have peeled the stems, but the leaves were delicious.

Brassica oleracea, var. ramosa